Finding the Lessons

I try to post well in advance of the upcoming Sunday.

You will want to scroll down to find the bible study for the lessons closest to the upcoming Sunday.

The blog will be labeled with proper, liturgical date, and calendar date.

You can open the monthly calendar to the left and find the readings in order.

You can also search below by entering the liturgical date, scripture, or proper. This will pull up all previous posts.

Enjoy.

Search This Blog by Proper and Year (ie: Proper 8B or Christmas C or Advent 1A)

Sunday, April 15, 2018

Easter 7B (or Ascension Transfered) May 13, 2018

Jesus collage made up of people's faces.
Prayer

You have glorified your Christ, O God, exalting to your right hand the Son who emptied himself for us in obedience unto death on the cross, and thus have exalted all of us who have been baptized into Christ's death and resurrection.  Clothe us now with power from on high that we may proclaim the good news to the world, confirming our message by the sign of our love for one another, and maintaining the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.  We ask this through Christ, with whom you have raised us up in baptism, the Lord who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God for ever and ever. Amen.

From Prayers for Sunday and Seasons, Year B, Peter J. Scagnelli, LTP, 1992.


Some Thoughts on John 17:6-19

"Another form of denial is to relegate the idea of unity to a very abstract level, where it counts for the oneness all Christians have in worshipping the one God and one Jesus, but is not allowed to affect how people work together and live together."

"First Thoughts on Year B Gospel Passages in the Lectionary," Easter 7, William Loader, Murdoch University, Uniting Church in Australia.


"Perhaps the most significant of the themes is in the prominent language of 'giving' which in nine occurrences runs throughout and characterizes the theology of this passage (as in the 75 times in the gospel as a whole) in terms of a mutual extravaganza of giving."

Commentary, John 17:6-19, James Boyce, Preaching This Week,WorkingPreacher.org, 2012.


Oremus Online NRSV Text


In the first part of this chapter (which runs from 1-8) Jesus asks for glory. That in his ministry glory will be given to God. That the weight of his ministry will bear fruit and draw people into the beauty which is God. In the next section (which begins with our reading this Sunday) Jesus speaks of his work as revealing vessel of God's grace. Then Jesus prays and offers hope to his disciples.


His disciples are already divided. They are divided over an against one another for leadership. They are divided about their support of Jesus; not all will deny him. They are divided by the desire of a kingly rule on the throne of David. They are divided on how the teachings of Jesus are to be interpreted. They are divided already as he prays for them. To this divided group of misfit followers Jesus offers a blessing of unity. Then he consecrates them for the mission of God. This unity is the bond provided by the Holy Spirit and it is called truth.

The truth is the truth of God and the truth of God in Christ Jesus.

We are of the same nature as the disciples. No matter how hard we work at our Christianity two things remain true: 1) That our sinful nature is not changed; we do not become less sinful by our own action. 2) Our salvation is completely dependent upon God in Christ Jesus; there is nothing in this world that we can do that will bring us closer to God's saving action.

God in Christ Jesus is friend to his disciples and he is friend to sinners; and we Christians are sinners.

Why does God bless us with unity? Because left to our own devices we would make some other standard our unifying principle. Our proclamation of the truth that God loves us and redeems us is to be the (THE PRIMARY) principle which unifies his followers. This is the truth.

As Anglican theologian and New Testament scholar E. J. Bicknell wrote in his hallmark book on the thirty-nine articles: the church and community of friends predates the Christian scriptures and it was belief in a man (rather than in a book) that offered the greatest impetus for mission. (p. 127, exposition on the sufficiency of scripture) We are unified in our Anglican Church because of our dogged principle of God in Christ Jesus and our understanding that we are saved by grace alone.

We are unified by the blessing of God in Christ Jesus and his life lived and crucified on our behalf. We are unified by his blessing of us in the Holy Spirit's guidance into the truth of this message. All else, all else, radiates from these central tenants of the Christian faith.

When they gathered around Jesus and asked him what must we do to perform the works of God, Jesus answered, "that you believe in him whom he has sent." (John 6:29)

So I wonder preachers, as you look out upon the faithful sinners gathered for a small measure of grace this Sunday...what do you think their unifying principle is? What in fact, dear ones, is your own unifying principle?

Some thoughts on I John 5:9-15

"If word count is any measure, the central issue in the assigned text is testimony (Greek =marturia, 'witness'), and specifically the validity and content of God's testimony about God's Son."

Commentary, 1 John 5:9-13, Audrey West, Preaching This Week,WorkingPreacher.org, 2012.

"The epistle wants to insist that the relationship between God and Jesus is entirely personal and entirely grown up. And the epistle wants to insist that the relationship between Jesus and those who believe is entirely personal and grown up, too."

Commentary, 1 John 5:9-13, David Bartlett, Preaching This Week,WorkingPreacher.org, 2009.

"Before we moralise, we need to understand that the author is preoccupied with conflict within the community and is not sitting back (or reaching out) to reflect on the plight of all peoples."

"First Thoughts on Passages on Year B Epistle Passages in the Lectionary," Easter 7, William Loader, Murdoch University, Uniting Church in Australia.


Textweek Resources for this week's New Testament Lesson


As humans we are always after replacing God with ourselves. Our hope seems to deny the work of Jesus on the cross on our behalf. We wish to pretend as if God did not reach out to us through his one way outpouring of self and love - for to do so might command us to love differently. The second manner in which we attempt to deny this work is to pretend that not only God's external action is not relevant or real but neither is God's internal work upon our soul. This is the way in which our author begins this passage in the letter of John. We bear witness, through the Holy Spirit, of God's work when we are witnesses externally offering testimony to the work of God in Christ Jesus and the work internally on our souls. This is evident in our transformation from selfishness to other focused.

With eyes of faith we open ourselves up to God's act of love and we open ourselves up to others. We also know that this unity with God and with others extends into life following death. This is faith but it is also a "sure and certain hope." Our passage in this life is a symbol or sign of the life to come. 

The key issue is that we as church have all too often wounded others religiously. We have used fear and purity to gain access to their lives. This is not true faith but instead a tainting of the faith that is in us. God has loved us and God has unified us bring us to himself. God invites us to live in the community of love - which is the author's goal. And, God has desired of us a life lived out of an understanding of our own salvation and which mimics Christ's life in its relationships with others. We are given this Holy Spirit that we might be bound together despite of our differences. So let us not live lives of lies which deny the work of God and seek instead to place God within our religious box for the sake of human powers and authorities. Here we should find true religion, one that is all too often not in us.


Some thoughts on Acts 1:15-26

"Whether by lot, interview, or committee vote, the way forward that offers the surest prospect of new life after betrayal focuses on listening and discerning through extended communal prayer, finding people of rich experience and deep integrity, and ending with some sign that this next person is called by God -- however a given community makes that determination."

Commentary, Acts 1:15-17, 21-26, Frank L. Crouch, Preaching This Week, WorkingPreacher.org, 2015.

"The point of this text, as well as with many other texts in Acts, such as the selection of deacons and the acceptance of gentiles is that the community is given the capacity of discernment to chart its course and that there isn’t any way to guarantee the success of it’s life together other than these given means."

"The Politics of Acts 1:15-17; 21-26," Timothy F. Simpson, Political Theology, 2012.

Where are we in the story? We have been jumping around the book of Acts a bit like the Holy Spirit and Philip. This reading finds us back at the beginning. We are at that juncture between the resurrection and appearance stories of Luke and the beginning of the book of Acts.

Jesus is risen, he has promised the Holy Spirit, the disciples continue to meet and devote themselves to prayer. But there is more.

Judas is dead. And, they must elect someone else to take his place. We discover (after the discourse about the field where Judas died) that there have been others traveling with Jesus and the disciples. Of course we knew this but we forget. Peter tells them they must chose one of them to join the ranks of the 12. Moreover, it appears important that the person be a "witness" to the things that have happened.

The passage says they cast lots to fill the position:
Joseph called Barsabbas, who was also known as Justus, and Matthias. Then they prayed and said, “Lord, you know everyone’s heart. Show us which one of these two you have chosen to take the place in this ministry and apostleship from which Judas turned aside to go to his own place.” And they cast lots for them, and the lot fell on Matthias; and he was added to the eleven apostles.
This is how the Matthias is chosen to replace Jesus.

What is interesting though is the qualification to be one of the twelve. It is pretty simple: they must be a witness to Jesus' resurrection.

As we think or ponder leadership and vocation of the baptized here the minimum requirement - that those we invite must be a witness. They must be willing to go as a witness of Jesus and his resurrection.

In our very complex world we have layered a lot onto this very simple key ingredient. Sometimes, I think we may actually diminish the qualification of being a witness believing that structure and organization will better serve the gospel.


Ascension Day Transferred



Prayer

You have glorified your Christ, O God, exalting to your right hand the Son who emptied himself for us in obedience unto death on the cross, and thus have exalted all of us who have been baptized into Christ's death and resurrection.  Clothe us now with power from on high, and send us forth as witnesses to the Messiah's resurrection from the dead, that, together with us, all the nations of the world may draw near with confidence to the throne of mercy. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God for ever and ever. Amen.

From Prayers for Sunday and Seasons, Year C, Peter J. Scagnelli, LTP, 1992.



Some Thoughts on Luke 24:44-53

"Incarnate Love, Crucified Love, Risen Love, now on the wing for heaven, waiting only those odorous gales which were to waft Him to the skies, goes away in benedictions, that in the character of Glorified, Enthroned Love, He might continue His benedictions, but in yet higher form, until He come again!"

From the Commentary on the Whole Bible (Jamieson, Fausset and Brown, 1871).

"The mission of the church here is nothing less than to go into the world as God?s people, and proclaim a subversive, transforming message about a suffering God who calls anyone without discrimination to respond."

Lectionary Commentary and Preaching Paths (Easter C7), by Dennis Bratcher, at The Christian Resource Institute.

Oremus Online NRSV Gospel Text



Leading up to the passage chosen for Ascension day Luke is telling a very clear story.  Jesus prophesied a coming reign of God.  The empty tomb shows that the prophet king was telling the truth. The old prophesies made by the greater and lesser prophets of Israel telling about the suffering servant who will come to remake a new Israel are true.  This is proved in the resurrection appearances.  Jesus himself in life and post resurrection offering a new vision of life lived in the kingdom.  He opens their minds to see what they did not see before.  The disciples are eyewitnesses to the new reality and they are to ministers interpreting and retelling the story.(Luke Timothy Johnson, Luke, 405) 

The disciples will not be left alone.  God is sending the Holy Spirit.  It cannot come and be fully in the world until he departs.  Moses and Elijah who offered a vision of this new reign of God and have been part of the Gospel story throughout are reminders that the power of God is always passed on to the successor.  (LTJ, Luke, 406)  In these last paragraphs of the Gospel of Luke we see clearly that instead of anointing one with the power and grace of the Holy Spirit, the disciples as a group are to receive the Holy Spirit and pass it on.

These last verses of Luke's Gospel are pregnant with the clarity that we are the inheritors of the good news of salvation.  We are to be the inheritors of the vision of a different reign of God. We are the inheritors of God's mission to the poor.We are the inheritors of God's prophetic voice which passes along to others what we have received.  

Some Thoughts on Ephesians 1:15-23

"The final phrases of a Jewish-styled opening berakah prayer of blessing join in this text to a Christocentric thanksgiving in 'prayer report' form."

Commentary, Ephesians 1:11-23, Sally A. Brown, All Saints C, Preaching This Week, WorkingPreacher.org, 2010.

"What meaning is communicated by the language of prayer not otherwise made available?"

Commentary, Ephesians 1:15-23 (Christ the King A), Karoline Lewis, Preaching This Week, WorkingPreacher.org, 2008.

"Most of our prayers are taken up with ourselves or with those nearest and dearest to us. Needs of others occupy a small place in our prayer life. Paul’s prayers are included by the Holy Spirit as a corporate part of the epistle."

"The Calling and Design of the Church: A Study in Ephesians," by Lehman Strauss at the Biblical Studies Foundation.




Christ has been raised and now is elevated. This particular passage comes after the developed theme of the church as Christ's body.  The elevation of Christ emphasizes the themes from Revelation that God has dominion over all and that the church is participating even now the new kingdom.  Christ is even now pouring himself into the new emerging Christian community. Together we are even now being drawn towards the fulfillment of God's desire to gather us in.  We may in fact live in the not yet like Paul's own little faithful community; but hope is present int he victory o f Christ raising and his elevation into heaven.


Some Thoughts on Acts 1:1-11

"As you can see, Ascension Day, especially for us Protestants, is a hard sell, or perhaps better, well past its sell-by date."

"Speculators or Witnesses?" John C. Holbert, Patheos, 2012.

"The second coming, or Parousia, brings the ultimate closure to the story of the kingdom and the gospel. But that is not to be the focus of the disciples? attention. Instead, Jesus shifts the emphasis from speculation about the future to demonstration and transformation of the present. God?s promise to revitalize Israel is not a matter of when (v. 7), but how (v. 8)."

Commentary, Acts 1:4-8, Gina M. Stewart, The African American Lectionary, 2008.

"You and I are the place of the promise of the kingdom now. Yet ultimately the kingdom is God?s reign, God?s effort, God?s gift. We are not asked to usurp God, but to share his purpose and by his Spirit become his action in the world."

"'Will you at this time restore the kingdom to Israel?' (Acts 1:6)," William Loader, Being the Church Then and Now: Issues from the Acts of the Apostles.



This passage is used in both the feast of the Ascension (A, B, and C years) and on Easter 7A. It is the prologue to the book of Acts. In it Luke begins by writing to Theophilus and making it clear that the first books was about “all that Jesus did”. The second book though is about all that is done by God through the power of the Holy Spirit through the Apostles. This is a book about mission and how the first followers of Jesus chose to respond to the events of Jerusalem and Galilee. That the teaching, suffering, death, and resurrection of Jesus forever changed the friends of Jesus.

The resurrected Jesus appeared to the followers of Jesus in many forms. Jesus was ever more real and present after his resurrection than he was, in some ways, before his resurrection. And, that his promise was to be with them to the end of the ages, by virtue of the power of the Holy Spirit.

Luke understands this work as the great restoration of the kingdom of Israel. This was not a political kingdom or a coup of the existing reigning powers and authorities. Instead, Luke appears to grasp the great expansion of the kingdom from primarily an inheritance for the faithful family of Abraham to include all sorts and kinds of people. He has a vision, God’s vision, that he mission work is to offer the reign of God to all people in every land and of every nation. Here we see an expansion, and glorious multiplication of invitation from the cross which echoes after the resurrection throughout the whole of creation to all humanity.

Luke does this through a weaving together of the past and an expansion of the present for the sake of the future.

Jesus like Elijah is to be taken up into heaven. Luke has cast him as Elijah but with a global prophecy.

Luke also builds this first chapter to echo the first chapters of his Gospel wherein the Angel promises that the reign of God, through Jesus, will be restored. “He will reign of the house of Jacob,” and, “His kingdom will have no end,” says the Angel. So the restoration is to begin with the coming of the Holy Spirit after the ascension. What was foreshadowed in the Gospel will not be unveiled or unraveled in the Book of Acts.

Richard Hays, in Echoes of Scripture in the Gospels, writes, “…the witness bearing of Jesus’ disciples that the nations are to receive the light of revelation that Isaiah promised…” foreshadowed by Simeon and the whole of the Gospel narrative. (272)

We are of course always reading backwards from our perspective. But Luke is careful to interpret the Old Testament prophecies, especially Isaiah, as always having meant that this light, this restored kingdom of Israel, is one that includes the gentiles.

The task here for the missional preacher is to think carefully about who we are speaking to in and what the invitation to us is. It would be normal for us to read back in that in fact we are the Gentiles and Luke’s prophecy and the work of Jesus and the Holy Spirit has been successful for here we are. Yet Luke’s missiological premise and our responsibility cannot be shirked so easily. The question for the sermon hearer and church goer is: who are our gentiles today?

It is my contention that we now hold the place of the religious in the Gospels or the disciples. We are the ones now responsible for answering the Holy Spirit’s invitation. The mission that once was to the “gentiles” is still held out to this church. It is an invitation to bear the light to all those who still live in darkness. And, to do so as disciples and bearers of that light. We were once far off, we were once the gentile, but no longer. Today we are the ones who shall be part of helping God in Christ Jesus restore the reign of God through the power of the Holy Spirit.

Whether we read this passage on the last day of Easter or on the Ascension, hear Luke’s invitation to tell the story of the risen and ascended Lord to the world.

Sermons Preached on the Ascension


Mothering Sunday, May 13, 2018, Easter 7B, Christ Church, Tyler


Wake Up From The Matrix

Jun 5, 2012

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